Categories
Better Business Bureau Technology

BBB Scam Alert: That Zoom invite is really a phishing scam

Thanks to the global pandemic keeping people at home, the popular video conferencing platform Zoom has seen usage grow exponentially in 2020. Naturally, this has attracted the attention of hackers and scammers. With a huge user base to target, con artists are using old tricks in new scams to try to steal your information.

How the Scam Works

Out of the blue, you receive an email, text, or social media message that includes Zoom’s logo and a message saying something like, “Your Zoom account has been suspended. Click here to reactivate.” or “You missed a meeting, click here to see the details and reschedule.” You might even receive a message welcoming you to the platform and requesting you click on a link to activate your account.

Scammers registered more than 2,449 Zoom-related domains from late April to early May this year alone. Con artists use these domain names, which include the word “Zoom,” to send you an email that looks like it’s coming from the official video conferencing service.

No matter what kind of phishing message you receive, scammers hope you will click on the link they’ve included in their email. These links can download malware onto your computer or lead you to a page where you are prompted to enter your login information. Entering your username and password gives scammers access to your account and any other account that uses a similar login and password combination.

How to Avoid Phishing Scams

  • Double check the sender’s information. Zoom.com and Zoom.us are the only official domains for Zoom. If an email comes from a similar looking domain that doesn’t quite match the official domain name, it’s probably a scam.
  • Never click on links in unsolicited emails. Phishing scams always involve getting an unsuspecting individual to click on a link or file sent in an email that will download dangerous malware onto their computer. If you get an unsolicited email and you aren’t sure who it really came from, never click on any links, files, or images it may contain.
  • Resolve issues directly. If you receive an email stating there is a problem with your account and you aren’t sure if it is legitimate, contact the company directly. Go to the official website by typing the name in your browser and find the “Contact Support” feature to get help.

You can view the original article from the BBB by clicking on the link below

https://www.bbb.org/article/news-releases/23421-bbb-scam-alert-that-zoom-invite-is-really-a-phishing-scam

Categories
British Columbia Technology

Credit Card Skimming

Here is an interesting article about the uptick of Credit Card Skimming that’s taking advantage of the rise of online shopping during the global pandemic.  Here are some takeaway points from the article.

Shopping online is convenient but not risk-free. Ultimately, users are the ones who can make savvy choices and avoid many pitfalls. Here are some recommendations:

  • Limit the number of times you have to manually enter your credit card data. Rely on platforms where that information is already stored in your account or use one-time payment options.
  • Check if the online store displays properly in your browser, without any errors or certain red flags indicating that it has been neglected.
  • Do not take trust seals or other indicators of confidence at face value. Because a site displays a logo saying it’s 100% safe does not mean it actually is.
  • If you are unsure about a site, you can use certain tools to scan it for malware or to see if it’s already on a blacklist.
  • More advanced users may want to examine a site’s source code using Developer Tools for instance, which as a side effect may turn off a skimmer noticing it is being checked.

To read more about the article from Malwarebytes, click on the link here

Categories
Technology

How to cut back on scam calls with an iPhone

If you have an iPhone with the latest version of iOS,  there is a wonderful little setting on the phone that will send those unwanted scam and robocallers directly to voicemail.  
You can find the setting in your Settings app,  and under Phone,  look for “Silence Unknown Callers”.   This will allow your legit callers to reach you,  but if an unknown caller is trying to call you,  it will go directly to voicemail.  

Here is a screenshot from my phone where the setting is..


If you are not sure if you have the setting on your phone,  check with one of your family members.